Thomas M. O'Key
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JOHN WALKER
INVENTOR OF THE FRICTION MATCH
May 29, 1781 - May 1, 1859

In the beginning of the nineteenth century, science had become a source of great regard for the advancement of personal prestige and wealth. The discoveries that came during the later years of the eighteenth century opened doors to fame and public acclaim for those who brought the great benefits of science to the wonders of the new world.

Among the many new things that were invented, one remained elusive and was considered an achievement of indispensable value. How to make fire in an instant.
The tinder box remained the sole article that had fixed itself in society with centuries of recorded necessity. Nothing had been so able to replace the humble, yet, required device. Aside from sharing the glowing coals of a well tended hearth, the striking of sparks from steel and flint upon dry and ready tinder was the only way survival was assured.

Several methods of achieving flame came in forms that grew from the science of chemistry and the search for the best chemistry was under considerable enterprise. The researchers were all hoping to be the one to discover the secret that brought them the coveted reward of such a discovery.

Well, in 1826 it happened! The sacred mixture that succeeded in creating flame at the touch of ones hand. Instant fire! It was in a small English village near the Northeast of the country where John Walker, a newly established Chemist, concocted his chemical mixture that brought forth the first friction match! 


ONE OF FIVE KNOWN WALKER LABELS 
GIVEN TO ME BY THE FAMOUS "MATCH KING", R. A. JONES





             
                                                           





The history of the book match. Included is the first match books ever made.
They were patented in 1892 by Joshua Pusey, a Philadelphia patent attorney.
Soon, he sold his patent to Diamond Match Company and by 1897 millions
of matchbooks were in production.



The first matches were called "Phosphoros" and were made in the early 1800's.
 Then the "Instantaneous light box" came along and replaced the dangerous Phosophoro match.
They were in production until the mid 1830's.





            The first friction matches....
        US Patent Alonzo Phillips 1835

      Clark's Friction Matches c.1852



Joseph's Phosphorus Matches c.1826


         Jones's Prometheans  c.1828

Charles Partridge Matches c.1856 one of the largest manufacturers in America



John H. Stevens c.1840


Jones's Promethean's c.1828


Wm. A. Clark's matchbox labels used as a book cover c.1842

Disclosure....

From the previous pages, it should become evident that the openness of my expose' gives insight most would not share about themselves. In an awkward way, the feeling is normal and easy to understand  as to why not. It's very uncomfortable to let the light out.... Yet, how else can the light get in?
For me, it has become obvious that there are reasons outside of my own regard that seem to create the output laid open.